Elad Lassry

  • Untitled (Anteater)

    2014
    chromogenic print, acrylic glass, wire, tubing, stainless steel, ceramic beads and pigment
    58.4 x 43.2 x 3.8 cm
    Courtesy of the artist and White Cube, London

    Elad Lassry’s subjects range broadly – from teapots and baked goods to models and cats – and are often photographed against boldly coloured backgrounds. He highlights his pictures’ three-dimensionality with painted frames or other materials whose colours and shapes are drawn from the images themselves. These still-life and portrait pictures recall unremarkable commercial photographs and are printed at 11 x 14” to recall the scale of a magazine page. As Lassry says, “I don’t think of them as photographs. I think of them as objects. I think of them as something that is suspended between a sculpture and an image.”

  • Untitled (Mozzarella)

    2014
    Chromogenic print, walnut frame, wire, PVC, paint
    61 x 45.1 x 3.8 cm
    Private Collection, NY

    Elad Lassry’s subjects range broadly – from teapots and baked goods to models and cats – and are often photographed against boldly coloured backgrounds. He highlights his pictures’ three-dimensionality with painted frames or other materials whose colours and shapes are drawn from the images themselves. These still-life and portrait pictures recall unremarkable commercial photographs and are printed at 11 x 14” to recall the scale of a magazine page. As Lassry says, “I don’t think of them as photographs. I think of them as objects. I think of them as something that is suspended between a sculpture and an image.”

  • Woman, Espresso Grinder

    2011
    Chromogenic print, aluminum frame
    36.8 x 29.2 x 3.8 cm
    Collection of Joan and David Genser

    Elad Lassry’s subjects range broadly – from teapots and baked goods to models and cats – and are often photographed against boldly coloured backgrounds. He highlights his pictures’ three-dimensionality with painted frames or other materials whose colours and shapes are drawn from the images themselves. These still-life and portrait pictures recall unremarkable commercial photographs and are printed at 11 x 14” to recall the scale of a magazine page. As Lassry says, “I don’t think of them as photographs. I think of them as objects. I think of them as something that is suspended between a sculpture and an image.”

  • Untitled (Planes)

    2013
    Chromogenic print, walnut frame, silk
    31.8 x 39.4 x 10.2 cm
    Collection of David Chan, New York

    Elad Lassry’s subjects range broadly – from teapots and baked goods to models and cats – and are often photographed against boldly coloured backgrounds. He highlights his pictures’ three-dimensionality with painted frames or other materials whose colours and shapes are drawn from the images themselves. These still-life and portrait pictures recall unremarkable commercial photographs and are printed at 11 x 14” to recall the scale of a magazine page. As Lassry says, “I don’t think of them as photographs. I think of them as objects. I think of them as something that is suspended between a sculpture and an image.”

  • Bits

    2013
    Gelatin silver print, walnut frame
    36.8 x 29.2 x 3.8 cm

    Elad Lassry’s subjects range broadly – from teapots and baked goods to models and cats – and are often photographed against boldly coloured backgrounds. He highlights his pictures’ three-dimensionality with painted frames or other materials whose colours and shapes are drawn from the images themselves. These still-life and portrait pictures recall unremarkable commercial photographs and are printed at 11 x 14” to recall the scale of a magazine page. As Lassry says, “I don’t think of them as photographs. I think of them as objects. I think of them as something that is suspended between a sculpture and an image.”

  • Untitled (Stool, Legs)

    2014
    chromogenic print, walnut frame and carpet
    36.8 x 29.2 x 3.8 cm
    Courtesy of the artist and White Cube, London

    Elad Lassry’s subjects range broadly – from teapots and baked goods to models and cats – and are often photographed against boldly coloured backgrounds. He highlights his pictures’ three-dimensionality with painted frames or other materials whose colours and shapes are drawn from the images themselves. These still-life and portrait pictures recall unremarkable commercial photographs and are printed at 11 x 14” to recall the scale of a magazine page. As Lassry says, “I don’t think of them as photographs. I think of them as objects. I think of them as something that is suspended between a sculpture and an image.”

  • Untitled (Eggs, Eyes)

    2012
    Still from 16mm film (colour, silent)
    9 mins. 45 secs.
    Courtesy of the artist and David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles, CA

    In this whimsical, almost abstract work, Elad Lassry recalls early-20th-century film experiments. He alternates between scenes of wooden eggs bouncing and eye-like apertures opening and closing. By relating the two shapes, Lassry positions them both as sources of creation: the egg, from which life emerges, and the eye, a source of perception. Staged by the artist, the respective dances of the objects within this film suggest that the creation at play is an artistic one.

  • Untitled (Eggs, Eyes)

    2013
    Still from 16mm film (colour, silent)
    9 mins. 45 secs.
    Courtesy of the artist and David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles, CA

    In this whimsical, almost abstract work, Elad Lassry recalls early-20th-century film experiments. He alternates between scenes of wooden eggs bouncing and eye-like apertures opening and closing. By relating the two shapes, Lassry positions them both as sources of creation: the egg, from which life emerges, and the eye, a source of perception. Staged by the artist, the respective dances of the objects within this film suggest that the creation at play is an artistic one.

  • Untitled (Eggs, Eyes)

    2014
    Still from 16mm film (colour, silent)
    9 mins. 45 secs.
    Courtesy of the artist and David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles, CA

    In this whimsical, almost abstract work, Elad Lassry recalls early-20th-century film experiments. He alternates between scenes of wooden eggs bouncing and eye-like apertures opening and closing. By relating the two shapes, Lassry positions them both as sources of creation: the egg, from which life emerges, and the eye, a source of perception. Staged by the artist, the respective dances of the objects within this film suggest that the creation at play is an artistic one.

  • Untitled (Eggs, Eyes)

    2015
    Still from 16mm film (colour, silent)
    9 mins. 45 secs.
    Courtesy of the artist and David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles, CA

    In this whimsical, almost abstract work, Elad Lassry recalls early-20th-century film experiments. He alternates between scenes of wooden eggs bouncing and eye-like apertures opening and closing. By relating the two shapes, Lassry positions them both as sources of creation: the egg, from which life emerges, and the eye, a source of perception. Staged by the artist, the respective dances of the objects within this film suggest that the creation at play is an artistic one.

  • Untitled (Putting Green)

    2014
    gelatin silver print and walnut frame
    29.2 x 36.8 x 3.8 cm
    Courtesy of the artist and White Cube, London

    Elad Lassry’s subjects range broadly – from teapots and baked goods to models and cats – and are often photographed against boldly coloured backgrounds. He highlights his pictures’ three-dimensionality with painted frames or other materials whose colours and shapes are drawn from the images themselves. These still-life and portrait pictures recall unremarkable commercial photographs and are printed at 11 x 14” to recall the scale of a magazine page. As Lassry says, “I don’t think of them as photographs. I think of them as objects. I think of them as something that is suspended between a sculpture and an image.”

  • Man (Mask, Lamp)

    2014
    Chromogenic print, painted frame
    36.8 x 29.2 x 3.8 cm
    Courtesy of the artist and David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles, CA

    Elad Lassry’s subjects range broadly – from teapots and baked goods to models and cats – and are often photographed against boldly coloured backgrounds. He highlights his pictures’ three-dimensionality with painted frames or other materials whose colours and shapes are drawn from the images themselves. These still-life and portrait pictures recall unremarkable commercial photographs and are printed at 11 x 14” to recall the scale of a magazine page. As Lassry says, “I don’t think of them as photographs. I think of them as objects. I think of them as something that is suspended between a sculpture and an image.”

  • Four Braids (Yellow)

    2012
    Chromogenic print, painted frame
    36.8 x 29.2 x 3.8 cm

    Elad Lassry’s subjects range broadly – from teapots and baked goods to models and cats – and are often photographed against boldly coloured backgrounds. He highlights his pictures’ three-dimensionality with painted frames or other materials whose colours and shapes are drawn from the images themselves. These still-life and portrait pictures recall unremarkable commercial photographs and are printed at 11 x 14” to recall the scale of a magazine page. As Lassry says, “I don’t think of them as photographs. I think of them as objects. I think of them as something that is suspended between a sculpture and an image.”

  • installation view, 'Sensory Spaces 3'

    2014
    Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam, The Netherlands

  • Installation view

    2012
    Padiglione d_Arte Contemporanea, Milan, Italy
    Photography: Alessandro Zambianchi

  • Installation view

    2010
    Kunsthalle Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
    Photography: Stefan Altenburger

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About Elad Lassry

“The questions for me are about this very mysterious unit that is the picture. It brings on a set of assumptions and built-in ways of looking with which I am in constant battle.”

At the centre of Israel-born, Los Angeles-based artist Elad Lassry’s work is the question: “What is a picture?” His practice suggests that the photograph is an elusive “unit.” Lassry uses multiple aesthetic modes and technologies to create analog images, digital interventions, moving pictures, design applications and applied arts that seem utilitarian but produce complex visual sensations. His ongoing investigation leads him to refer back to and experiment with a variety of visual sources – textbooks, manuals, film stills, marketing materials and science texts – which at turns contradict and play off one another in his work. Lassry uses this dynamic to pinpoint what he calls a “contemporary condition” in which the photograph is a flexible entity, seductively powerful and yet untrustworthy. “Once the photograph is not what it appears to be,” Lassry asks, “what else is at stake?”


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